Several new world records in deep freediving

Herbert Nitsch (Austria) and William Trubridge (New Zealand) showed that they are in control of the world records in the three depth disciplines, after beating their own and each others records several times in an event in the Bahamas.

Herbert Nitsch made a 120 meters dive in the Free Immersion discipline (pull yourself down and up along a rope). Herbert has moved the record eight meters deeper than his old record from last year. The dive time was: 4′28″. The Austrian veteran coolly pulled down the line into his freefall, then sank to 120 meters, and returned with a tag from the bottom plate, claiming his 31st world record.
He failed in a first attempt where he turned at 102 meters, and then set the record to 114 meters, briefly loosing it to William Trubridge at 116 meters, failed at a 118 meter attempt only to return and do a successful dive to 120 meter.
In the competition in Deans Blue hole, Long island on sunny Bahamas the FIM record was challenged also by Asian champion Ryuzo Shinomiya turning at 105 meters.
William Trubridge set an amazing depth record swimming with out fins to 92 meters depth (330 feet) only to continue five days later with a 95 meters Constant Weight without fins dive, 5 meters deeper than his old world record from 2009. The dive time: 3′45″. An amazing dive without fins – on only one breath.
His dives are executed with precision, taking 7 breast strokes down to the sink phase (where his lungs have compressed and lost their buoyancy). After a free fall down to 95 meters focusing on relaxation and equalization, he returns using 27-28 arm strokes.
William Winram (Canada) made an attempt for the same record but turned at 76 meters.

Herbert Nitsch that recently took the prestigious Constant Weight record (monofin down and up) from Czech Martin Stepanek, added another meter to his own record, putting it to a depth of 124 meters. From the organizers web site:

“Powering off the bottom at 1.4m/s his legs started to fail 35 meters from the surface, and he began his trademark arm stroke-legkick alternations. At 3:57 he surfaced, but on the wrong side of the rope, hitting his head on the underneath of the boom. For most freedivers this would tip them over the edge on a difficult dive, but although Herbert’s neck and chin dipped under, the waterline stopped just below his mouth as he struggled back to the line, saving himself from disqualification (athletes must keep their airways above the water after surfacing). Herbert admitted to still being a little dazed from narcosis or fatigue, even after finishing decompression 10 minutes later. This was the 30th world record for the Austrian, and the deepest self-powered freedive of all time.”

William Trubride 92 CNF
Herbert Nitsch 114 FIM
William Trubride116 FIM
William Trubride 95 CNF
Herbert Nitsch 120 FIM
Herbert Nitsch 124 CWT